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13 Students want to be involved in activities where they’ve experienced success. Without some success, interest is eventually lost and learning will not occur. The brain reacts to repeated failure by shutting down. For the culminating activity, students in the audience are encouraged to give positive feedback and ask a question. This encourages the presenter to want to build on the experience in the future and it keeps the audience actively involved in listening.
14 The brain is a pattern seeker. It makes sense of new learning by linking it to existing neural pathways. If there is nothing to connect to, the brain will discard the information and it will soon be forgotten.
The “Roadmap” gives students the “big picture” of what they’ll be learning. By seeing the “Roadmap” in advance, students are able to understand how the lessons are organized, how the activities are related to the overall objectives, and what will be expected of them. The discussion activates prior knowledge, reduces stress, and prepares the brain to seek connections. At the end of each lesson, the students are brought back to the “Roadmap”. This helps them review, confirm understanding, and build on what has been learned.
http://education.jhu.edu/newhorizons/Journals/spring2010/thebraintargetedteachingmodel/index.html (Brain Target 3)
15 The brain organizes information in categories. Data charts and other graphic organizers are visual representations of the way information can be categorized to make it easier to understand and remember.
http://www.readinga-z.com/more/graphic_org.html
http://www.citrus.k12.fl.us/staffdev/Graphic%20Organizers.htm
http://www.study-skills-for-all-ages.com/graphic-organizers.html
16 Each brain is unique. We respect this uniqueness and promote the mastery of learning goals when we provide students with multiple ways to manipulate new knowledge.
http://education.jhu.edu/newhorizons/Journals/spring2010/thebraintargetedteachingmodel/index.html (Brain Target 4)
17 “Lecture continues to be the most prevalent teaching method in secondary and higher education despite evidence that it produces the lowest degree of retention for most learners.” (Sousa, 2006) Going over information superficially and quickly does not build the strong neural connections needed for long term memory. Life-long learning is most likely to occur when students are able to apply content, skills, and processes to tasks that require them to engage in problem-solving and higher-order thinking skills. When students are given opportunities to use knowledge in a meaningful way, they examine concepts more deeply. This enables the brain to use multiple systems of retrieval and strengthens and expands neural connections.
http://www.braintargetedteaching.org/
http://www.mcli.dist.maricopa.edu/forum/fall03/brain.html
http://education.jhu.edu/newhorizons/Journals/spring2010/thebraintargetedteachingmodel/index.html
http://www.educationworld.com/a_curr/curr140.shtml
18 Students review concepts and deepen their understanding of the content when they’re asked to predict test questions and/or prepare a test to give to other students. This type of rehearsal strengthens connections in the brain and increases the likelihood that content will be remembered.



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