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Mission Accomplished - Days 1-3

Discovery Experience 5 – Mission AccomplishedThe students will become acquainted with a variety of robots and the jobs they do by participating in notional activities and sharing information gathered from a variety of resources.

Time Allotment: 7 days

Day 1: (Why do We Make Robots?)

Materials Needed:

  • Internet access
  • Bulletin board graph


Procedure:

  1. Review: With table partner, discuss for 1min, 30 seconds what you have learned about robots so far
  2. Lecture: The reason we want to program is to get a result.
  3. Remind students of some of the jobs robots do that are posted around the room.
  4. Lecture: Often we use robots to do things that are necessary but boring.
  5. In their teams, have the students take a capped pen and, trading off every five traces, have them write a letter on the ground all the way across the classroom.
  6. Lecture: We make robots to do dull, dangerous, and dirty jobs.
  7. In their student log, students are to think of one task they wish a robot could do for them. They are to (1) tell what that task is (2) tell what they would call their robot (3) say why they want the robot for that task, and (4) draw a picture of the robot, making sure they have appropriate appendages to help do that task
  8. Share their tasks with their groups and with the class (These can also be shared at the beginning of the next day's lesson.)


Assessments for Learning Objective 5
Learning Log entry

Discovery Experience 5 – Mission AccomplishedThe students will become acquainted with a variety of robots and the jobs they do by participating in notional activities and sharing information gathered from a variety of resources.

Day 2-3: (Introduction to Dull Jobs: Tracing a letter or a shape)

Materials Needed:

  1. Lego Robot
  2. Mindstorm
  3. Tape for the floor


Procedure:

  1. Review previous day's activity
  2. Explain that often the jobs given to robots are dull jobs and share examples from the robot bulletin board from Discovery Experience 1.
  3. Explain these Lego robots can also be used to do dull jobs. One such job is to trace a shape over and over again.
  4. Give students a shape to trace and have them figure out the commands to trace the shape
  5. After they have traced the shape once, they have to make the robot trace the shape five more times, moving the robot to the left 1 ft so that the shapes are in a line.
    • Students may use a loop command or just copy the code after moving the robot
  6. In learning log, students answer the question: Why would it be better to use a robot to trace a shape 100 times rather than do it yourself? Can you imagine some areas in your life where you would like a robot to do some dull jobs for you? Explain.


Assessments:

  1. Learning Log entry
  2. Marking off students when the task is completed


* Extension Activities


For Dull Jobs:

  1. Students have to get their robot to communicate the answer to a few math problems
  2. Examples:
    • Fractions: A robot has to travel 1/5 of a 10 foot line on the ground.
    • Shapes: Robot has to make an isosceles triangle
    • Multiplication test: Has to go number of inches for each problem to answer the problem.
    • Perimeter and area: Has to trace a certain perimeter of a 2x4 rectangle and then move over and write the area
    • Story problem: A robot goes 3 ft forward, turn 90º to the right, go forward 2 ft, turn 90º to the left, go forward, turn 90º to the left, go forward 2 ft, turn 90º to the left, go forward 5 ft, turn 90º to the right, go forward 1 ft. How far from the starting place is the robot?
    • Division: the robot has to go back and forth to answer the question
  3. In learning log: What are some better ways to communicate? Are there better robots designed to communicate these answers? Can robots be used to teach math?

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Contact Info

  • Kathleen Letsky, Curriculum Specialist
  • Nathan Patia, STEM Specialist
  • Salvador Cabusi, Technology Specialist
  • Robot Invasion
  • Krause Family Foundation
  • Honolulu, Hawaii
  • Tel: 808.778.1265

The Krause Family Foundation: ‘Alana Ke Aloha

  • ‘Alana Ke Aloha places relationship at the heart of all learning.  We create and support projects that engage participants’ imagination, collaboration, and problem solving toward a healthy planet.
  • The Krause Family Foundation: ‘Alana Ke Aloha is a private, 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization (EIN: 27-1531421) registered (01/21/2010) in the State of Hawai‘i.